Lab Services

Donor Testing Lab 

The Donor Testing Laboratory specializes in the testing profiles performed for donor suitability of blood, tissues, cord blood and hematopoietic stem cells. Tests for non-blood donation purposes are dependent upon specific regulatory and facility requirements. Every unit of blood donated at Indiana Blood Center undergoes the following tests in order to ensure a safe and adequate blood supply throughout Indiana. 

ABO group and Rh type - Although there are more than 400 antigens on red blood cells, the ABO group and Rh type are considered the most important to blood transfusion. The test identifies each donor's blood type (A, B, O or AB) and Rh type (negative or positive) to allow appropriate matching to the patient’s blood type.

Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi antibody) - The Trypanosoma cruzi parasite that causes Chagas disease is common in rural areas of Central and South America. It can cause a life-long infection that develops into chronic illness affecting the heart and digestive tract in up to 30 percent of those infected. This test is not required by the FDA. Every component distributed by Indiana Blood Center is from a donor who has been tested at least once and found to be negative for Trypanosoma cruzi antibody.

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) - This test is a passive particle agglutination assay intended for the qualitative detection of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and Immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies to cytomegalovirus (CMV) in human plasma and serum. A positive result provides evidence of past or current infection with CMV but is not intended for diagnostic use.

Hepatitis B core antibody (Anti-HBc) - Hepatitis B also produces several different viral antigens. A positive test indicates probable exposure to hepatitis B at sometime in the past.

Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) - The complex hepatitis B virus produces several different viral antigens. All blood donors are tested for the surface antigen. Its presence indicates that a person is infected and might be infectious or a carrier.

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) nucleic acid - A test for the presence of the hepatitis B virus. Positive test results will appear earlier in infection than the test for HBsAg or Anti-HBc on the PRISM or other methodologies.

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody - HCV accounts for over 90% of previously known non-A, non-B hepatitis, and it is the leading cause for liver transplant in the United States today. Exposure to HCV results in the production of HCV antibodies, which are detected by this screening test. Screening results must be confirmed by additional tests. This is not a diagnostic test for hepatitis C virus. A diagnosis can only be made by other laboratory tests as well as a physician's evaluation.

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) nucleic acid - A test for the presence of the HCV virus. Test results are positive earlier in infection than the test for HCV antibody.

HIV I/II antibody - Exposure to HIV virus results in the production of HIV antibodies, which are detected by this screening test. Screening results must be confirmed by additional tests. This is not a diagnostic test for AIDS. The diagnosis of AIDS can only be made by other laboratory tests as well as a physician's evaluation.

HIV nucleic acid - A test for the presence of the HIV retrovirus. Test results are positive earlier in infection than the HIV I/II antibody test.

Human T-Lymphotropic viruses (HTLV) types I/II antibody - Detects antibodies of viruses called Human T-Lymphotropic Virus types I/II, which have been linked to adult t-cell leukemia and a progressive neurological disease. These diseases are primarily found in Japan and the Caribbean countries, and are rarely seen in the United States. Exposure to HTLV results in the production of HTLV antibodies, which are detected by this screening test. Screening results must be confirmed by additional tests. This is not a diagnostic test for HTLV. A diagnosis can only be made by other laboratory tests as well as a physician's evaluation.

Red blood cell antibodies - It is possible that a person who has received blood, tissue or graft products or has been pregnant has produced these antibodies as a result of exposure to red cell antigens that are "foreign" to his/her immune system. Some of these antibodies may be harmful to certain patients if transfused.

Serologic test for syphilis - Detects antibodies formed during past or current syphilitic infection. The organism that causes syphilis does not survive well in units of blood stored at refrigerator temperatures, but this test is required by the FDA. It is considered an indicator of risk of exposure to other sexually transmitted diseases, such as HIV and hepatitis.

West Nile virus nucleic acid - A test for the presence of West Nile virus.

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