Donors

Your hemoglobin level can fluctuate frequently, even on a daily basis. So, if you are deferred from donation due to a low hemoglobin level, please try again. Low hemoglobin is the most common reason for deferral. We encourage you to follow the dietary tips below and try again soon!
You can help maintain a healthy hemoglobin level by eating a diet rich in iron, and avoiding iron-reducing foods. Examples of iron-boosting foods include beans, spinach, beef, shrimp, tomatoes, broccoli, rice, peas, watermelon and potatoes. Examples of iron-reducing foods include chocolate, caffeinated beverages and high calcium-containing foods.
The normal range is 14-18 g/dL in men and 12-16 g/dL in women. A donor must have a hemoglobin value of at least a 12.5 g/dL to safely donate whole blood.
Hemoglobin is the iron-containing pigment of red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to the tissues of the body.
We want to make sure your iron levels are adequate, and that taking some of your blood will not leave you with too little iron, leading to a condition called anemia.
As you may recall the very first question we ask on the donor registration form is "Are you feeling well today?" If you have a head cold, even though you do not have a fever, you cannot donate until you are feeling well. If you are not feeling well that is a sign that your system needs to keep all your nutrients in order to fight any infection or cold.
Wounds, incisions, and/or stitches/sutures (external) should be clean and free from apparent infection (non-purulent/draining, no excessive redness, no heat). An Indiana Blood Center technician must be able to view and verify the condition of the wound. If it cannot be examined, e.g., wound/sutures are under a cast, the donor must be deferred until healing is complete.
You can donate while taking Fosamax. However, sometimes a person can donate while taking a medication but the reason they are taking the medication prevents them from donating.
When taking an antibiotic for an infection you can donate the day after you take the last dose provided the infection is resolved.
You can donate while taking Allegra-D. You can also donate with allergies unless the allergies are extremely active or much worse than normal. You can donate taking Plaqenil and Salagen. You can also donate with an Auto Immune Condition provided you are symptom free, or if symptoms are mild/minor and do not interfere with routine, daily activities on the day you are donating.
You can donate while taking Nuvigil for Narcolepsy.
A person cannot donate blood while taking blood thinners. If your medications change in the future, please check with us at that time so we can reevaluate your eligibility.
If you are taking an antibiotic for an infection you can donate the day after you take the last dose provided the infection is resolved. If you are taking antibiotics for a preventative purpose, and no infection exists, you can donate blood.
If you are currently pregnant, you must wait until six weeks after conclusion of your pregnancy, including miscarriages and abortions, before donating. If you are breastfeeding/nursing, you are eligible to donate the first six weeks after you give birth.
Every donation is tested before it is made available to a patient. This testing takes 36 hours. If because of the test results a person's donation cannot be used by a patient, the donor is notified. Likewise if the test results indicate that the donor needs to see a physician, the donor is notified. In either of these situations, the donor is notified by telephone, e-mail or letter depending on the urgency of the notification. Attempts to notify a donor begin immediately once the need to notify the donor has been established.
To help identify a potential blood donor who might be at high risk for the AIDS virus all blood centers in the United States follow guidelines established by the Food and Drug Administration. Prior to donating blood, all donors complete a donor registration form. There are questions on this form that assist to identify a person who might be at high risk for the AIDS virus. Additionally, all blood donations are tested for the AIDS virus before they are ever made available to a patient. The Food and Drug Administration has additional information available for you on their web page. You can access this at www.fda.gov
There are two situations and two time periods that may apply to your husband. If either of these situations apply than your husband can not currently donate. Persons who are former or current U.S. military personnel, civilian military personnel, or a dependent of U. S. military personnel who resided at U.S. military bases in Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, Spain, Portugal, Turkey, Italy or Greece for 6 months or more from 1980 through 1996 can not donate. Persons who have spent 5 years or more cumulatively in Europe from 1980 to the present can not donate. Europe is defined as Albania, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Republic of Ireland, Italy, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Macedonia, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom (UK is defined as England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales, the Isle of Man, the Channel Islands, Gibraltar, and the Falkland Islands), and Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.
There are no restrictions for travel to either Australia or New Zealand.
The current guidelines for travel to United Kingdom are: Persons who have spent three months or more cumulatively in the United Kingdom from January 1, 1980 through December 31, 1996 cannot donate. The United Kingdom is defined as England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales, the Isle of Man, the Channel Islands, Gibraltar, and the Falkland Islands. Based on the dates you provided you are ineligible to donate blood.
Persons who are former or current U.S. military personnel, civilian military personnel, or a dependent of U.S. military personnel who resided at U.S. military bases in Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, Spain, Portugal, Turkey, Italy or Greece for 6 months or more from 1980 through 1996 are ineligible to donate blood.
Persons who have spent 5 years or more cumulatively in Europe from 1980 to the present are ineligible to donate blood. Europe is defined as Albania, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Republic of Ireland, Italy, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Macedonia, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom (UK is defined as England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales, the Isle of Man, the Channel Islands, Gibraltar, and the Falkland Islands), and Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.
After receiving the Varicella Vaccine, you will need to wait one month before you are eligible to donate blood.
There is not a deferral period for the Japanese Encephalitis vaccination. The Yellow Fever vaccination requires a person to wait for 2 weeks before donating. Regarding Typhus - If you received the injection Typhus vaccination there is not a deferral period. If you received the oral Typhus vaccination, which is administered over a 7 day period, you need to wait for 2 weeks after completing the vaccination before donating.

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